Sunday, July 17, 2011

Nonfiction Monday: Hatch!

Hatch!
written and illustrated by Roxie Munro
(Marshall Cavendish Children) 2011
Source: Mebane Public Library

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On the first page of Hatch! is a rapid fire list of facts about birds titled Did You Know? Birds that can fit on a child's palm (bee hummingbird) and birds that fly while sleeping (albatross). Birds that fly one hundred miles an hour (peregrine falcons) and birds that migrate twenty-five thousand miles in a year (arctic tern). After whetting our appetite with these cool facts, author/illustrator Roxie Munro moves into four page spreads, each dedicated to a particular species. The first of four pages asks the question "Can you guess whose eggs these are?" Page 2 gives you textual clues about the bird. Pages 3 and 4 feature a brilliantly colored landscape featuring the bird and its habitat along with more facts about the bird. Other animals who live in the immediate environment are also listed. Nine different birds from around the world are featured. One facet I like is the wide variety of habitats shown in this book.

Hatch! lends itself to comparing different birds and environments. This would be a good book for teaching students about creating tables for listing information in order to compare.  The science vocabulary is also very rich (dominant, fledgling, migration) with a handy glossary listed in the back matter. I think it would be interesting to follow Roxie Munro's template and have students study different birds and create similar four page spreads for a class book. If you teach a unit on birds (and why aren't you?), Hatch! is a beneficial resource for your classroom.

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2 comments:

  1. What a comprehensive book this appears to be on the topic, thanks for sharing it! And I appreciate your addition of things to be taught from the book like creating tables. THank you for the post!

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  2. Thank you, Carol! I appreciate your kind comments. Comprehensive is an excellent word to use for this book.

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