Monday, November 8, 2010

Time Zones

Time Zones
written by David A. Adler; illustrated by Edward Miller
(Holiday House) 2010
Source: Mebane Public Library
Check out Nonfiction Monday at Shelf-Employed

If you are teaching a unit on space and the earth's rotation, Time Zones would be a good resource for explaining why different places on the planet have different times. Author David A. Adler tells the history behind the creation of time zones and why it became necessary to invent them. For example, in the late 1700's it wasn't really important for time zones to exist since people couldn't travel very far in a day's time. Travelers simply reset their clocks or watches when they arrived in a new place. They would set them by the town clock or set their timepiece at noon if the sun was directly overhead. Train travel prompted railroad companies to set time zones in 1883 for North America and an international conference the next year set them for the rest of the planet. With the help of Edward Miller's humorous and informative illustrations, Adler is able to deliver interesting information like why time zone boundaries have such strange shapes. My favorite piece of information that I learned was that China and India, despite their geographic size, each have only one time zone.

4 comments:

  1. This should make the concept easier to explain than the little disk on the top of the globe. :)
    Thanks for participating in today's Nonfiction Monday.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for visiting, Lisa! Adler and Miller are a great team and they break down this complicated topic to make it easier to understand.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi, Jeff. This is really interesting. We have two little ones (3 and 5) in our family, and we travel a lot. This will be a good book to have on hand when they start realizing that the times are different when we travel. Plus, I've been meaning to start reading more nonfiction books to them, especially since there seem to be some really fun ones these days...

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you for visiting, Kerry! You're right about trying to read more nonfiction with your kids. My wife and I didn't think about it with our first child, but made a concerted effort with the second child to expose her to more nonfiction. The nonfiction books are fabulous these days.

    ReplyDelete